Your Questions Answered – Meet the Crossley and Quinlan lab

For the next few blogs we’re trying something new – we’re introducing the Crossley and Quinlan lab with a short questionnaire!

First up (because they answered first), we have Lana, Manan and myself.

 

 

 

LANA (whom you may know from such posts a On Preparing and Giving Short, Effective Presentations (UNSW 1MT) and Science, Stars and Lessons So Far: How I got into Research)

Question 1: Describe who you are to the Crossley and Quinlan lab

My name is Lana and I’m a 3rd year PhD student 😊

 

Question 2: Describe your research using emojis

💭💡👩‍🔬🧪☢⚡🧬🧫🔬😭


Question 3: Now actually describe your research

I investigate the transcription factor ZBTB7A (affectionately known as POKEMON) and its role in globin regulation

 

Question 4: What made you want to be a scientist?

I’ve always enjoyed learning about science and the beauty of it so doing science in high school/university and pursuing it as a career just seemed like the next logical step.

 

Question 5: What answer did you get in the DOPE personality quiz – do you think it suits you?

50% dove, 35% owl – doves are meant to be people-orientated, loyal, friendly, hard-working and a great team player but tends to avoid change, confrontation, risk-taking and assertiveness. Some aspects I identify with – I like to think I’m loyal and hard-working, and I do tend to avoid confrontation and risk-taking.

 

Question 6: Do you have an example of the highs and lows of research?

High – doing 70+ gel shifts in the span of one year, getting quick results and pushing the project forward

Low – doing 70+ gel shifts in the span of one year

 

Question 7: Weird fact about you that only your nearest and dearest would know?

Whether it be ballet or demonstrating/tutoring undergraduate students – I love to teach (weird, I know right)

 

Question 8: What experiment do you think is your ‘expertise’?

Gel shifts (electrophoretic mobility shift assays)

 

 

 

MANAN (you can see Manan’s previous posts here Getting Into Research As An Undergraduate and A Day in the Life of a Scientist III

Question 1: Describe who you are to the Crossley and Quinlan lab

Manan Shah, 3rd Year PhD Student.

 

Question 2: Describe your research using emojis

No

 

Question 3: Now actually describe your research

Investigating how different factors such as DNA structure affect transcription factor binding.

 

Question 4: What made you want to be a scientist?

I found a lot of other options boring and restrictive and also was fascinated by research and science.

 

Question 5: What answer did you get in the DOPE personality quiz – do you think it suits you?

Owl, I think it suits okay.

 

Question 6: Do you have an example of the highs and lows of research?

Low – Having to drop a project after working on it for two years and not really getting anything out of it.

High – Pursuing a new idea, thinking of new experiments and/or analysis.

 

Question 7: Weird fact about you that only your nearest and dearest would know?

I swore the one thing I definitely wouldn’t do at Uni was science when I was in Year 10.

 

Question 8: What experiment do you think is your ‘expertise’?

I don’t think I have a particular expertise. Jack of all trades, master of none?

 

And last up is yours truly, Beth!

 

 

 

BETH (you may have seen my posts including – Science and Travel: An (Un)likely Connection or The Do’s and Don’ts: Lab Etiquette

 

Question 1: Describe who you are to the Crossley and Quinlan lab

My name is Elizabeth (more commonly Beth) and I’m a 4th year PhD student – Nearly finished!

 

Question 2: Describe your research using emojis

👩‍🔬💉✂️🧬🧫🔬🙆🧯🤔💭

Question 3: Now actually describe your research

I investigate the effect of naturally occurring variants within the b-globin locus to understand why levels of foetal-haemoglobin differ between individuals, despite being encoded by a single (duplicated) gene.

 

Question 4: What made you want to be a scientist?

In high school I knew a girl who had been diagnosed with Retinitis pigmentosa, a rare genetic disorder which involves a breakdown of cells in the retina and results in loss of vision. I distinctly remember going to research the cause of the disease and thought – surely they have a cure… science has come so far! That was the spark. As the saying goes “If not us, who? If not now, when?”

 

Question 5: What answer did you get in the DOPE personality quiz – do you think it suits you?

I’ve done the DOPE quiz about every year – and despite my Owl % staying strong and level, I’ve progressed from being an owl to an eagle over the past year. I’ve lost my dove and peacock qualities and built up the eagle to the point it overtook everything else. Conceivably, as I’ve gone through my PhD, I’ve become more decisive… or perhaps more impatient?

 

Question 6: Do you have an example of the highs and lows of research?

High – Getting one of my ‘crazy’ ideas to work

Low – Having something not work, but having it have nothing to do with you or your own effort! It just happens.

 

Question 7: Weird fact about you that only your nearest and dearest would know?

To destress after a long day of thinking, I’ve tried multiple new methods of distractions. I love to read but get distracted thinking about my projects. I tried to paint but (so far, I’m still trying!) I’m not very talented. Now, I crochet blankets and dog coats to give to local rescue shelters.

 

Question 8: What experiment do you think is your ‘expertise’?

As Manan said, a jack of all trades but a master of none. But as the saying continues, “but oftentimes better than a master of one.” I’ve tried to get experience with anything I can get my hands on for my PhD. There are certain techniques I love doing most and feel like I have a good grasp on – one example of this is Flow Cytometry.

 

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